APsaA’s Long March to Inclusion: The role of the internet in organizational change by Arnold Richards

Click Here to Read: APsaA’s Long March to Inclusion: The role of the internet in organizational change by Arnold Richards.  Paper to be given at the Conference Listening in the Age of Google – Clinical Perspectives and Social Action at NAAP on October 18th, 2008. 

Click here for Info: On the NAAP Conference: Listening in the Age of Google – Clinical Perspectives and Social Action on October 18th, 2008.

Click Here To View: Powerpoint for this Presentation by Arnold Richards

Explore posts in the same categories: Controversial, NYPSI Centenary 1911-2011

One Comment on “APsaA’s Long March to Inclusion: The role of the internet in organizational change by Arnold Richards”

  1. moisy shopper Says:

    Dear Arnie, Thank for the excellent summary and the analogy with the Balkans et al was quite appropriate. Personally, I resisted certification and refused to be certified come what may. However when E James Anthony, Alex Kaplan and Paul Dewald wanted the fledging St Louis Inst. to have a child psa program we needed two certified child analyst locally. EJA was one and I was to be the other. I yielded, spent the summer writing up my cases for them, was not interviewed by any committee and was awarded the honor of TA, SA in adult and child. So now we have a child program. One would think this was the end of it. Not so. Despite my publications, public lectures, initiation of programs, large teaching assignments etc. etc. I was never asked to analyze a candidate (for a long while the EC “assigned” the candidate to a TA) and when the candidate had their choice, I somehow was not chosen. Since I hovered between innovative and “rebellious” , I was not on the “A” list. However I supervised many candidates. The facts are clear; the reasons are theoretical.
    On another matter, I am one of the few analysts who gets involved in forensic issues so I am particularly aware that these changes that you and I so value where the results of legal challenges, which I believe were more instrumental in securing change than all the internet discussions.
    Perhaps you could at some point suggest that those making the law and rules of an organization have both a Cs and Ucs motive to insure that the changes are not too great, that their own power is not too greatly infringed upon, and that they don’t give any more than they are forced to give. It did not bother the committee chairs of the American to pass their chairmanships to friends and colleagues (whose views were well known to them) and as a result the chairs of many committees were the fiefdoms of those from a small group of institutes. These changes were accomplished not by law but more by shaming with the facts which, once tabulated, were so transparent to all.
    That’s all at this time. (not for publication, but feel free to use the ideas), At the midwinter meetings you asked for my recollection of the Peakskill riots. I have that finished and will send it to you. All the best, Moisy

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