Archive for the 'Movies' Category

In The Shape of Water, Small Acts of Rebellion Make a Splash

Thursday, December 14th, 2017

Click Here to Read:   In The Shape of Water, Small Acts of Rebellion Make a Splash: Guillermo del Toro’s latest film, about a mute cleaning woman who liberates and falls in love with a humanoid amphibian monster, is intimate in scale but tells a potent story of empowerment by Mengna Da on the HyperAllergic website on December 13, 2017.

From Brooklyn to Beirut Film at CJH

Wednesday, December 13th, 2017

Thursday, December 14
7 pm
From Brooklyn to Beirut
Presented by American Jewish Historical Society
Film Premiere & Discussion
A World Premiere screening of Rola Khayyat’s “From Brooklyn to Beirut,” a landmark documentary exploring the landscape of belonging for the community of Lebanese Jews in New York – along with the fragilities and complexities associated with a politicized identity
Tickets: $10 general; $5 AJHS members, seniors, students; $12 at the door
To Register, Click Here

The Man Who Invented Christmas

Friday, December 8th, 2017

Click Here to Read: The Man Who Invented Christmas: Charles Dickens and the writing of A Christmas Carol By Joanne Laurier on The World Socialist Web Site on December 8, 2017.

By a Thread – A Daughter’s Search for Her Mother’s Hidden Identity at CJH

Thursday, December 7th, 2017

Sunday, December 10
1:30pm
By a Thread – A Daughter’s Search for Her Mother’s Hidden Identity
Presented by Jewish Genealogical Society & Center for Jewish History
Lecture
New York journalist Marisa Fox knew her mother as Tamar Fromer Fox, a self-proclaimed freedom fighter and hero of the Israeli War of Independence. But Tamar’s Polish roots were more elusive, as she avoided any conversation of how she escaped the fate that claimed her own mother and large family who were murdered at Auschwitz. Nearly 20 years after Tamar died, Marisa discovers her mother had a hidden identity and goes in search of it. After a 7-year investigation from Manhattan to Melbourne, Toronto, Tel Aviv, Detroit, Haifa, Berlin, and Malmo, Sweden, finding survivors and relatives who knew her mother, Fox has directed a documentary about her search called “By a Thread.” Connecting the dots between her mother’s alias and her true genealogical roots and secret past, Fox asks: Is identity something that’s genetically determined or are we creatures of self-invention and reinvention?
Tickets: JGS members free; guests are welcome, $5 at the door.
Link: http://programs.cjh.org/event/by-a-thread-2017-12-10

Violence, Grief and a Harsh Conscience in “Wind River”

Wednesday, December 6th, 2017

by Herbert H. Stein

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Psychoanalysis meets film at dedicated festival in Bucharest

Wednesday, December 6th, 2017

Click Here to Read:  Psychoanalysis meets film at dedicated festival in Bucharest by Ro Insider on the Romania Insider website on December 5, 2017.

LBJ and Marshall: Film biographies deal with mid-20th century US struggle for racial equality

Monday, November 27th, 2017

Click Here to Read: LBJ and Marshall: Film biographies deal with mid-20th century US struggle for racial equality By Fred Mazelis on the World Socialist Website on November 25, 2017.

The Philosophical Salon for October 2017

Monday, November 27th, 2017

Click Here to Read:  The Philosophical Salon for October 2017 on the Philosophical.com website.

Moe Berg, A film by Aviva Kempner

Wednesday, November 22nd, 2017

Click Here to Read:  Moe Berg, A film by Aviva Kempner on the Moe Berg Film website.

75 years since the release of Hollywood classic Casablanca

Wednesday, November 22nd, 2017

Click Here to Read: 75 years since the release of Hollywood classic Casablanca By Joanne Laurier on the World Socialist Web Site on
November 22, 2017.

Denis Villeneuve’s Blade Runner 2049

Monday, November 20th, 2017

Click Here to Read: Denis Villeneuve’s Blade Runner 2049: A dreary future By Carlos Delgado on The World Socialist Web Site on November 20, 2017.

Ai Weiwei’s Human Flow is a major work, but what does the defense of immigrants entail? By Eric London 15 November 2017

Wednesday, November 15th, 2017

Click Here to Read:  Ai Weiwei’s Human Flow is a major work, but what does the defense of immigrants entail? By Eric London on the World Socialist Web Site on November 15, 2017.

Film Night Nise: The Heart of Madness at WCSPP

Thursday, November 2nd, 2017

WCSPP FILM NIGHT NISE: THE HEART OF MADNESS Friday, November 3, 2017 7:30 P.M. Admission: $10

Directed by Roberto Berliner, this beautiful movie explores the power of human connection, art and the ideals at the heart of psychoanalysis. Set in 1940’s Brazil, the movie tells the true story of Dr. Nise da Silviera (played by award-winning actress Gloria Pires). The only female psychiatrist in a psychiatric hospital on the outskirts of Rio de Janeiro, Dr. da Silviera refuses to employ the new and violent electroshock therapy in her treatment of schizophrenics. After challenging her colleagues she is ridiculed and left to run the long-defunct occupational therapy program. As she seeks to find alternative ways to care for her patients who have long been mistreated, isolated and abandoned to institutional care, Nise first creates a space of safety and connection. She then begins to understand the meaning of her patients’ behaviors and actions. Sustained by her deep belief in the human capacity for communication, the potential for healing through the symbolic expression of inner experience and its recognition by others, and inspired by the work of Carl Jung, Nise helps transform the lives and experiences of the patients in her care.

A discussion following the screening will be facilitated by Connie M. de Pinho, Ph.D.

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May a word be spoken on behalf of Kevin Spacey?

Wednesday, November 1st, 2017

Click Here to Read:  May a word be spoken on behalf of Kevin Spacey? By David Walsh on the World Socialist website on November 1, 2017.

An interview with a Loving Vincent painter-animator

Thursday, October 19th, 2017

Click, Here to Read:  An interview with a Loving Vincent painter-animator By Joanne Laurier on the World Socialist Web Site on October 19, 2017

 Motherless Brussels: Notes on Chantal Akerman’s ‘No Home Movie

Sunday, October 8th, 2017

Click Here to Read:   Motherless Brussels: Notes on Chantal Akerman’s ‘No Home Movie’: Thirteen ways of looking at the great filmmaker, two years after her death by suicide By J. Hoberman on the Tablet website on October 4, 2017.

“The Remains of the Day”: The Tragic Solution

Sunday, October 8th, 2017

This is the second of three articles comparing three films, It Can Happen to You (posted October, 2010), The Remains of the Day (posted November, 2010) and It’s a Wonderful Life (to be re-posted December, 2010)

Both It’s a Wonderful Life and It Could Happen to You provide us with gratifying fantasies that allow us to feel, through identification, that we have overcome our limitations.  George Bailey and Charlie the cop are trapped by circumstances and conscience.  George must overcome his idealization of his father and his reluctance to overcome his male rivals.  His father dies, his rivals step aside, and he becomes a hero to the town.  Charlie is trapped in a marriage to a woman he does not love by a conscience that will not allow him to be unfaithful.  The film allows him to leave his wife and to find the woman of his dreams without his ever having to cross the boundaries of his conscience.  There is another solution, the tragic solution.  In The Remains of the Day , Stevens the butler is trapped by his position and his idealization of his father and his employer.  He loves a woman, but unlike George Bailey he cannot pursue her and unlike Charlie the cop he does not have her thrown into his arms.  He remains hopelessly trapped by his circumstances and his character, and we, the viewers, are trapped vicariously with him. (more…)

Spellbound: In the world of psychoanalyses

Saturday, September 9th, 2017

Click Here to Read:  Spellbound: In the world of psychoanalyses by Rammath N Pai Raikah in the Navhind Times on September 9, 2017.

The ‘greatest film-maker who ever lived’

Thursday, August 31st, 2017

Click Here to Read:  The ‘greatest film-maker who ever lived’ It’s not right that the Swedish master Ingmar Bergman is always described as dark and gloomy. He was a deeply humane artist with great empathy, writes Benjamin Ramm. 31 July 2017.

Interactive Documentary on “Comfort Women” Asks You to Listen to Victims of Sexual Violence

Thursday, August 31st, 2017

Click Here to Read:  Interactive Documentary on “Comfort Women” Asks You to Listen to Victims of Sexual Violence: Tiffany Hsiung’s The Space We Hold spotlights the stories of three women held in sexual slavery by the Japanese Imperial Army during World War II by Allison Meier on the HyperAllergic website on August 29, 2017.

Still from The Space We Hold interactive documentary (screenshot via National Film Board of Canada)